Top Alexander Hamilton Facts

Alexander Hamilton was an American statesman and Founding Father of the United States. He was an influential political figure during the nation's evolution from British colonization to a young republic. He was a well-known political figure who played a key role in the birth of the modern United States.

  1. Alexander Hamilton was born in the British West Indies in late 1755 or early 1757. He had an illegitimate birth, and his father left his family when he was young.

  2. Hamilton was the first US Secretary of the Treasury and had a major role in modernizing the US financial system. He also founded the US Mint and the US Coast Guard.

  3. Hamilton wrote 51 of the 85 essays in the Federalist papers and became known as one of the most influential interpreters of the Constitution. He also defended the Bank of the United States during its debates.

  4. Hamilton helped to frame the Judiciary Act of 1789, which established the US federal judiciary system. He also helped to create the 1st political party in the US, the Federalist Party.

  5. Hamilton was a soldier and leader during the Revolutionary War and was instrumental in the victory of the Battle of Yorktown. He was a close advisor to General George Washington, and the two men developed a strong professional and personal relationship.

  6. Hamilton served in the US Congress as a representative for New York from 1782 to 1783 and as a senator from 1793 to 1795.

  7. Hamilton was fatally wounded in a duel on July 11, 1804, in Weehawken, New Jersey, against Aaron Burr, resulting in his death the following day.

  8. Hamilton was an abolitionist who believed in the gradual emancipation of enslaved people. He was a strong advocate for the rights of African Americans.

  9. Hamilton had a personal and professional rivalry with Thomas Jefferson, the third US President. The two men had different views on government roles and the economy, and their differences drove a rift between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans.

  10. Hamilton was an early enthusiast of a strong central government. He believed the US Constitution should capture all legislative powers within the national government and that certain rights should be entrenched in a bill of rights.


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